It was not easy for Munduruku Indigenous leaders to leave their reserve in Jacareacanga, in northern Pará state, and get to Brazil’s federal capital, Brasília, to join a huge protest against ongoing anti-Indigenous measures in the National Congress. And it was not only due to the 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) that separate both cities. In their first attempt to undertake the journey, on June 10, their bus was reportedly attacked by illegal miners who slashed the vehicle’s tires and threatened the driver. “The garimpeiros [illegal miners] knew we were coming to claim for their expulsion from our reserve, so they barred our entourage and threatened us,” Ediene Kirixi Munduruku, a female Munduruku leader, told Mongabay in a phone interview. They finally managed to join more than 800 other Indigenous people from all over the country in Brasília five days later, after the Federal Public Ministry demanded a police escort to protect the convoy. Once in the capital, however, the group faced yet more violence, this time from government security forces. The confrontation happened on June 22 near the Chamber of Deputies, Brazil’s lower house of Congress. That’s where a bill that would remove several Indigenous rights, called PL 490, was under deliberation in one of the commissions. The legislative session was suspended due to the confrontation, but was resumed on June 23, where the commission approved the bill. It will now go to a voted before a plenary session of the Chamber of Deputies and, if it passes, to the…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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