TIBATI, Cameroon – In Mbanti-Mbang village, Joseph Adamou and his family are living in fear. Living in the Tibati district located nearly 1,400 kilometres (870 miles) north of Cameroon’s capital Yaoundé, they are afraid of being removed from their farms that became part of the state land reserve six years ago. At the end of October, the head of the Gbaya family, one of the six Indigenous ethnic groups living in the district of 72,000 people, was informed that the Cameroonian company Tawfiq Agro Industry would be setting up an agro-industrial facility. Gbaya, 60, and his family could lose access to the ten hectares (24 acres) of arable land they have been farming and using for trade for more than 20 years. A young Mbororo shepherd from the Ardo Fougue family herds a flock of sheep on the land reserve / Image © Yannick Kenné. Last May, the Cameroonian government decided to allocate 95,000 hectares (over 234,000 acres) of land – three times the size of Cameroon’s capital Yaoundé – to the company Tawfiq Agro Industry, to develop an agro-industrial facility aimed at reducing expensive Western food imports. The price of imported food has increased this past year. According to Tawfiq Agro Industry, it aims to contribute to the development of local industry. This Djerem village is home to a community of nomadic people who depend mainly on cattle breeding for their livelihood. Tensions are high among the Ardo Fougue family, whose leader is fearful of the project’s impact. This…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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