In 1993, a lone stream frog was discovered once but never found again in the wild. Herpetologists thought the frog species went extinct before it could be studied. Then, last year, more than a quarter of a century since the frog was seen, two Filipino biologists rediscovered it in one of the least surveyed forest reserves in the southern island of Mindanao. The rediscovery tale of Pulchrana guttmani, the species first described from Mount Busa on the border of Sarangani and South Cotabato provinces, is an intriguing one. Despite being big enough to cover half a grown man’s palm and with a striking golden-brown body contrasted by a grayish-blue underbelly, the frog species has eluded herpetologists and confused Indigenous guides who tried, yet failed, to spot the species in the thicket of the Mindanao wilds. In a paper published in Herpetological Notes, Kier Pitogo and Aljohn Saavedra reported the rediscovery of what they say may be the rarest amphibian in the Philippines, and possibly, the world. “Despite its brightly colored body and large size, it has eluded biologists for decades!” Pitogo tells Mongabay. “What makes it special is the fact that it is the only Philippine frog for which no known sightings of living individuals have been documented since its original discovery. So, you can consider it as one of the rarest amphibians, if not the rarest, in the Philippines.” The elusive Pulchrana guttmani, a frog species in the southern Mindanao region, Philippines. Image courtesy of Kier Pitogo P. guttmani was…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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