In a little more than 20 years, Indonesia has gone from being a minor player in the global coal industry to playing a central role as a key consumer and producer of coal. And even as investors and key export markets are shifting toward alternative energy sources, Indonesia’s laws are increasingly tying future economic growth to the fossil fuel. “Indonesia remains one of the biggest challenges for people who would like to shift the world’s dependence on coal,” said Isabella Suarez, Southeast Asia analyst at the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air, a research organization. “The incentives to keep dirty coal cheap are in place, and that’s likely not going to change soon, unfortunately.” Since 2010, Indonesia has opened 22.7 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired power capacity, third in the world behind India and China. That means coal now accounts for nearly 60% of the country’s electricity generation, a figure that has risen steadily since 2010. Production has also grown dramatically, from just 67 million tons (mt) in 2000, to 325 mt in 2010, and 616 mt in 2019, making Indonesia the world’s biggest thermal coal exporter and 12th-largest consumer of coal. And if the industry has its way, there’s more to come. According to a report from Global Energy Monitor, Indonesia accounts for more than 75% of planned coal power construction in all of South and Southeast Asia, part of a plan to increase overall domestic consumption of coal to 30 or 40% of all production. This upswing…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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