PANTURA, Indonesia — Not so long ago, Lestari Priyanto needed only sail for a week from his home port on the north coast of Java Island to land a boat full of fish. Now he charts a course almost 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles) away to the Maluku Islands, where he spends a month at sea just to turn a profit. Lestari prospered for years in waters close to home after he used savings and a loan to buy his own 10-gross-ton boat. Today, as head of a fishers’ association in Rembang, Central Java province, he sees little future in the business. “It’s been seven months but only two or three ships have docked,” Lestari told Mongabay near his port in Rembang in June. “I feel bad — many have become unemployed.” Java’s fishing captains see dark clouds forming even before the worst effects of climate change impact global oceans. Operating costs are rising, fish are becoming increasingly scarce, and the government has banned the widely used cantrang, the Indonesian term for a seine net. A cantrang net at the Brondong fishing port in East Java province. Image by Asad Asnawi for Mongabay. Seine fishing uses wide nets weighted down to the seabed to scoop up large volumes of schooling fish. But the seine’s unrivaled effectiveness combined with the global expansion of industrial-scale fishing has made the practice unsustainable; around 90% of fish species worldwide are either overfished or fully exploited. Much of Java’s fishing industry switched to using the cantrang…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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