Long before climate change had been deemed a global crisis, the Kogi Indigenous people. who have long lived in seclusion in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada mountains were already warning that industrial societies were destroying the Earth and needed to change their ways. In 1990, the Kogi invited British filmmaker Alan Ereira into their community – a rare occurrence at the time – to film their message to their world.  They showed him the melting glaciers and drying paramo, the Andean alpine tundra around them, saying it reflected the suffering of the earth. If the rest of the world didn’t change their exploitative ways and listen to the Kogi, the planet would suffer, they said in the resulting BBC documentary. Today, the Kogi maintain that they have the knowledge to save the Earth and have invited a group of scientists to work with them and show them what that is. In a new project, called Reviving Water: Munekan Masha — meaning “let emerge or be born” — the Kogi will work with non-Indigenous scientists to restore three areas of degraded land in the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, focusing on water sources. But the crux of the project, say its organizers, is their intention to create education material to teach the Kogi conservation method in western schools, universities and elsewhere. The Kogi community will both lead and be the main decision-makers of the project, showing scientists from the University of Zurich their conservation methods and process. Anthropologists and education experts, as well…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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