BRASÍLIA — In April 1997, Brazil’s capital was the site of the brutal murder of an Indigenous leader. Galdino Jesus dos Santos, 44, was in Brasília for demonstrations demanding the demarcation of the territory of his Pataxó-Hã-Hã-Hãe people, in northeastern Bahia state. On the night of April 20, having been locked out of his boarding house after a late meeting, he slept at a bus stop. Five young men from well-off families saw him there alone. They doused him in gasoline and set him on fire. Galdino died hours later in hospital with burns to 95% of his body. It was a “joke,” his assailants would later tell police. A federal judge agreed, clearing four of them of murder charges and sentencing the fifth, 17 at the time, to three years in juvenile detention on the lesser charge of bodily harm. Two of the assailants were the sons of judges themselves. Twenty-four years later, Indigenous people living in Brasília still report prejudice and violence against them. Born in an Indigenous village in Amazonas state, Īrémirí Tukano says he experienced countless episodes of violence and discrimination since moving to Brasília 13 years ago. But one in particular hurt him deeply, he says. It was in 2012, and he was working as an intern at the Ministry of Culture. “I was delivering a document and a public servant asked me if I was Indigenous. I said yes. And he said: ‘What are you doing here? You should go back to the bush.…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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