In her spare time as a research assistant in the forests of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, Jessica Haysom turned to perusing mammal field guides. She found herself especially intrigued by the vast number of animals that live high in the Bornean forest canopy, about which next to nothing is known. “The more I read, the more I realized that there was so much going on in the canopy which very few people were studying,” she said. Now, she’s uncovering the secrets of that lofty realm. In a recent study in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, Haysom and her team took cameras up into the trees, completing the first in-depth and systematic camera-trapping survey of an arboreal mammal community in Southeast Asia. The study reveals insights into Sabah’s tree-dwelling mammals, evidence of new behaviors, and the first ever photograph of a rare flying rodent. “For a long time, we’ve only studied what’s on the ground because that’s really all that we’ve had access to,” Haysom, a doctoral student at the University of Kent, U.K., told Mongabay. “But the canopy is just as important and it would be foolish to ignore it because there’s so much that’s going on up there.” Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) mother and baby photographed in the trees in a logged forest. The researchers observed orangutan family groups on several occasions during tree fruiting periods. Image courtesy of Jessica Haysom/Durrell Institute of Conservation & Ecology (DICE), University of Kent Into the canopy Arboreal, or tree-dwelling, mammals play a vital…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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