“This is a good time. It’s when we used to wake up to cast our net on the river,” Adan Pereira says. “The hard part was to play odds and evens to see who’d get in the water. But I’d feel sorry for my father and do it.” It’s 4 a.m., and we’ve just boarded a boat to cross the Ribeira de Iguape River in Brazil’s São Paulo state. The sky is starry sky, the moon is waning, and the wind blows a brisk 9° Celsius (48° Fahrenheit) on this early winter morning. We’re headed to where Adnan and his father, Antônio, farm the left bank of the Ribeiro de Iguape. Along with other members of their quilombo, or traditional Afro-Brazilian community, of Sapatu, they produce mainly bananas and palm hearts. “What a nice breeze,” says Adan, 33, a farmer for whom the weather is never bad. Dew drops glitter as the silvery moonlight hits the banana grove. A wood stove soon crackles into life: coffee, roasted bananas and taiá, or boiled taro root. That’s how Adan likes to start his day. “Our ancestors used to work in this place, and it has been passed on from generation to generation,” he says. “We clear the land, then we burn it and plant on it. And then, at a certain point, we leave that place to rest, regenerate, and we plant in another place. That’s a rotating system, that’s quilombola land management.” In 2018, the Traditional Quilombola Agricultural System (TQAS) of…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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