I’m messaging P., a Haitian friend and colleague, seeking an assist with this article. It’s about to publish, and I’ve asked him to help me get an interview with the country’s foremost hydrologist. I’m not comfortable writing a story about Haiti with no Haitian interviewees, I tell him, but so far no one has responded. “He said no,” texts P. “His house is in an area controlled by gangs.” Haiti has been gripped by paroxysms of unrest since 2018, the time of my last visit. So I’m not surprised when P. describes the current situation: no electricity, roadblocks on every intersection, banks and businesses closed, a man shot just outside his door. I’m not even surprised that someone in the heart of it all might not want to talk to a foreign journalist, even about something as apparently innocuous as hydrology. But one detail P. shares freezes my blood. Since yesterday, he tells me, his young family has been totally without water, as have residents of several areas of Haiti’s metropolitan region. That and soaring gas prices led to the current raging civil unrest. P. is waiting for things to quiet down in the street outside, then he is going out to find some, somewhere. Anywhere. Water isn’t always a problem in Haiti, at least not everywhere. Take the farming town of Verrettes, for example, hugging the bank of a small tributary of the Artibonite River, the country’s largest river. When I visited one sunny afternoon, teenagers splashed about on…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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