Every item of food has a story to tell. Kiwifruits may grow in New Zealand, but they can be flown across the world to sit on a grocery store shelf in the U.S. Corn may start its life in Argentina, then be shipped thousands of miles away to the U.K. to be made into breakfast cereal. Each part of a food item’s journey produces greenhouse gases — whether it’s the carbon emissions from the forests that are mowed down to grow crops, or the methane gas released from livestock such as cows and goats. There’s also the exhaust from the trucks, trains, ships and planes that transport food across borders, and the fluorinated gases that seep from the refrigerators that keep food cool and fresh until it’s purchased. A new paper published in Nature Food paints a picture of food systems by providing an estimate of how much greenhouse gas (GHG) is emitted when food is produced, processed, transported, packaged, consumed, and even disposed of. It found that in 2015, global food systems were responsible for about 25% to 42% — or about a third — of all global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agriculture in South Africa. Image by Rhett A. Butler. Before this paper was published, other studies attempted to quantify the GHG emissions of global food systems, including a 2019 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that found that food systems were responsible for about 21% to 37% of overall anthropogenic emissions. This new study,…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.