How does one solve the issue of unsustainable fishing? Conservation zoologist Tim McClanahan was pondering that question when he started a research project looking at overexploited coral reef fisheries in Kenya in the 1990s. “It was a lifetime goal … because it’s one of those big unanswered questions,” McClanahan, a senior coral reef scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, told Mongabay. “And I had no idea how long it would take to solve the problem.” He initially expected the project to take about six or seven years, but it ended up taking 24, culminating in a paper published in the June 2021 issue of the journal Marine Policy. The study looked at two interventions to overfishing in Kenya: the prohibition of all fishing activity in a marine reserve, and a ban on destructive small-meshed dragnets. The paper found that while both methods boosted the number of target species caught over the study period, the marine reserve ultimately provided more long-term benefits in terms of sustainability. “I’m not a true believer in reserves,” McClanahan said. “I could have easily been convinced otherwise. Part of why I took 24 years to solve this problem is because I’m that cautious personality [and I wanted] to make sure that these things were correct to the best of my knowledge, and that any conclusions were sustainable over the long term.” A Kenyan fisherman arranging his net on a beach. Image by Emily Darling / WCS. ‘Nature doesn’t respond that fast’ According to a 2020 report…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.