Kategori: Svenska Ranger- och Naturvårdsföreningen Sida 1 av 15

Life sentence for 11 accused in Wayne Lotter murder trial | European Ranger Federation

Wildlife crime does not pay: According to several news sources, yesterday saw the conviction and sentencing of eleven criminals who have been on trial for the 2017 murder of conservationist and PAMS Foundation co-founder, Wayne Lotter. All eleven were found… Read More Läs mer

Read November newsletter and feedback on ERC | European Ranger Federation

Our next training offers, your chance to give us feedback on the ERC, a review of the extraordinary visit from El Salvador rangers in Europe, our congress film to take you back into the atmosphere and more in our November… Read More Läs mer

Rare, critically endangered gecko making dramatic recovery in Caribbean | Mongabay Nyheter

A rare gecko no larger than a paperclip is making a comeback in the Caribbean, thanks to conservation efforts by environmental groups and the government. The Union Island gecko (Gonatodes daudini), known for its jewel-like markings, has seen its population grow from around 10,000 in 2018 to around 18,000 today — an increase of 80%. The gecko resides in an approximately 50-hecatre (123-acre) swath of old-growth forest on Union Island, part of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. When it was discovered in 2005, the animal almost immediately became the target of exotic pet collectors, according to Fauna & Flora International (FFI), a wildlife conservation organization focused on protecting biodiversity. The organization worked with Re:Wild and local partners like Union Island Environmental Alliance and St. Vincent and the Grenadines forestry department to develop a species recovery plan, which involved greater protected area management and expansion as well as anti-poaching patrols and camera surveillance. The gecko’s wild population had shrunk to one-fifth its original size since being discovered. One 2017 study found that it was the most trafficked reptile from the Eastern Caribbean. The gecko has been a popular target for exotic pet collectors. (Photo courtesy of Re: Wild/Jeremy Holden) “As a Unionite and a community leader, I am extremely proud to be a part of this success story,” Roseman Adams, co-founder of the local Union Island Environmental Alliance, said in a press release. “Without a doubt, our shared, unwavering dedication and sacrifice has brought us this far. We now have to…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

Rare, critically endangered gecko making dramatic recovery in Caribbean | Mongabay Nyheter

A rare gecko no larger than a paperclip is making a comeback in the Caribbean, thanks to conservation efforts by environmental groups and the government. The Union Island gecko (Gonatodes daudini), known for its jewel-like markings, has seen its population grow from around 10,000 in 2018 to around 18,000 today — an increase of 80%. The gecko resides in an approximately 50-hecatre (123-acre) swath of old-growth forest on Union Island, part of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. When it was discovered in 2005, the animal almost immediately became the target of exotic pet collectors, according to Fauna & Flora International (FFI), a wildlife conservation organization focused on protecting biodiversity. The organization worked with Re:Wild and local partners like Union Island Environmental Alliance and St. Vincent and the Grenadines forestry department to develop a species recovery plan, which involved greater protected area management and expansion as well as anti-poaching patrols and camera surveillance. The gecko’s wild population had shrunk to one-fifth its original size since being discovered. One 2017 study found that it was the most trafficked reptile from the Eastern Caribbean. The gecko has been a popular target for exotic pet collectors. (Photo courtesy of Re: Wild/Jeremy Holden) “As a Unionite and a community leader, I am extremely proud to be a part of this success story,” Roseman Adams, co-founder of the local Union Island Environmental Alliance, said in a press release. “Without a doubt, our shared, unwavering dedication and sacrifice has brought us this far. We now have to…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

Photos: Newcomer farmers in Brazil embrace bees, agroforestry and find success | Mongabay Nyheter

PARAÍBA VALLEY, Brazil — Under the frigid morning air of the Mantiqueira Mountains in southeastern Brazil, honeybees begin leaving the hive. “When day brakes they are calmer,” says Mara Galvão, a smallholder farmer and beekeeper who is part of the rural agrarian reform settlement Nova Esperança in the Paraíba Valley. Beekeepers Mara, Ana, Cristiane and Yessica manage a box of bees that survived the fires that affected the region during the dry season of 2020. Part of Ana’s plot was consumed by the fire, but the hives resisted. Sítio LaCuna, Egídio Brunetto Agroecological Settlement, Lagoinha, Paraíba Valley, Brazil. Image by Inaê Guion. Nestled between mountains connecting the states of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, Paraíba Valley is home to half a dozen of the more than 500 agrarian reform settlements of the Landless Workers’ Movement (MST) spread across Brazil. One of the largest social movements in the world, MST has generated controversy among politicians and public opinion for its ideological structure inspired by Marxism and methods promoting land occupations. The movement seeks to help landless families occupy, settle and farm throughout the country based on Brazil’s 1988 Constitutional promise that land should “serve a social purpose.” In the South American nation, persistent land inequality has further spurred the movement — about 10% of the largest farms occupy nearly three-quarters of agricultural land. The movement embraces food sovereignty and environmentalism. So far, the movement has led more than 2,500 land occupations, with about 370,000 families settled on 7.5…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

‘It was a shark operation’: Q&A with Indonesian crew abused on Chinese shark-finning boat | Mongabay Nyheter

In November, Mongabay revealed a massive illegal shark fishing and finning operation across the fleet of Dalian Ocean Fishing (DOF), a distant-water fishing firm that has claimed to be China’s largest supplier of sashimi-grade tuna to Japan. The investigation followed from an earlier story revealing widespread labor abuses across the same fleet. Both articles were based on dozens of interviews with Indonesian men who worked on the company’s longline boats between 2018 and 2020. One of these former deckhands, Rusnata, now 40, was born and raised in Majalengka, a district in Indonesia’s West Java province. The first time he left the area was in 2014, when he went to work on a Taiwanese longliner fishing for tuna in the Atlantic Ocean. After returning two years later, he struggled to find work on land, having only a primary school education, so he took a job on the Long Xing 607, one of around 35 boats then in DOF’s fleet. The following account has been combined from multiple interviews Mongabay conducted with Rusnata in 2021 and 2022, that have been heavily condensed and edited for clarity. Mongabay: How did you end up going back for a second stint on a fishing boat? Rusnata: I was enjoying being back on land, and I was with my wife. But slowly the money started to run out. We needed more, and there was pressure from my wife’s family. So I decided to go back to sea. When I got home the first time, my intention…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

‘It was a shark operation’: Q&A with Indonesian crew abused on Chinese shark-finning boat | Mongabay Nyheter

In November, Mongabay revealed a massive illegal shark fishing and finning operation across the fleet of Dalian Ocean Fishing (DOF), a distant-water fishing firm that has claimed to be China’s largest supplier of sashimi-grade tuna to Japan. The investigation followed from an earlier story revealing widespread labor abuses across the same fleet. Both articles were based on dozens of interviews with Indonesian men who worked on the company’s longline boats between 2018 and 2020. One of these former deckhands, Rusnata, now 40, was born and raised in Majalengka, a district in Indonesia’s West Java province. The first time he left the area was in 2014, when he went to work on a Taiwanese longliner fishing for tuna in the Atlantic Ocean. After returning two years later, he struggled to find work on land, having only a primary school education, so he took a job on the Long Xing 607, one of around 35 boats then in DOF’s fleet. The following account has been combined from multiple interviews Mongabay conducted with Rusnata in 2021 and 2022, that have been heavily condensed and edited for clarity. Mongabay: How did you end up going back for a second stint on a fishing boat? Rusnata: I was enjoying being back on land, and I was with my wife. But slowly the money started to run out. We needed more, and there was pressure from my wife’s family. So I decided to go back to sea. When I got home the first time, my intention…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

Some tree-dwelling primates may adapt more easily to life on the ground, massive study shows | Mongabay Nyheter

Some primates spend their entire lives in trees. They avoid the ground, where preferred food is scarce and predators lurk. But deforestation and climate change are threatening their homes in the branches. Habitat loss has some primates swinging down to see what the ground offers, scientists reported recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The massive study included more than 150,000 hours of observations from 20 sites in Madagascar and 48 sites in the Americas. A global team of 118 researchers analyzed 34 years of field observations of tree-dwelling monkey and lemur species. “We wanted to understand what factors were the most influential in increasing ground use” by arboreal primates, said Timothy Eppley, postdoctoral fellow at the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance in California. Eppley led the study, and several of the co-authors credit his leadership for its success. A Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) sits alert while foraging on the forest floor in Madagascar. Photo credit: Timothy Eppley On average, primates in the study spent less than 5 percent of their time on the ground. It doesn’t sound like much, but any time on the ground is dangerous. Predators can strike in a matter of seconds, said study co-author Patricia Wright, a conservation biologist at Stony Brook University in New York. Even so, some animals take the risk. The study revealed that species with certain social and physical traits may have an advantage. Primates with diverse diets and larger group sizes might adapt more easily to terrestrial…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

Some tree-dwelling primates may adapt more easily to life on the ground, massive study shows | Mongabay Nyheter

Some primates spend their entire lives in trees. They avoid the ground, where preferred food is scarce and predators lurk. But deforestation and climate change are threatening their homes in the branches. Habitat loss has some primates swinging down to see what the ground offers, scientists reported recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The massive study included more than 150,000 hours of observations from 20 sites in Madagascar and 48 sites in the Americas. A global team of 118 researchers analyzed 34 years of field observations of tree-dwelling monkey and lemur species. “We wanted to understand what factors were the most influential in increasing ground use” by arboreal primates, said Timothy Eppley, postdoctoral fellow at the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance in California. Eppley led the study, and several of the co-authors credit his leadership for its success. A Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) sits alert while foraging on the forest floor in Madagascar. Photo credit: Timothy Eppley On average, primates in the study spent less than 5 percent of their time on the ground. It doesn’t sound like much, but any time on the ground is dangerous. Predators can strike in a matter of seconds, said study co-author Patricia Wright, a conservation biologist at Stony Brook University in New York. Even so, some animals take the risk. The study revealed that species with certain social and physical traits may have an advantage. Primates with diverse diets and larger group sizes might adapt more easily to terrestrial…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

Some tree-dwelling primates may adapt more easily to life on the ground, massive study shows | Mongabay Nyheter

Some primates spend their entire lives in trees. They avoid the ground, where preferred food is scarce and predators lurk. But deforestation and climate change are threatening their homes in the branches. Habitat loss has some primates swinging down to see what the ground offers, scientists reported recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The massive study included more than 150,000 hours of observations from 20 sites in Madagascar and 48 sites in the Americas. A global team of 118 researchers analyzed 34 years of field observations of tree-dwelling monkey and lemur species. “We wanted to understand what factors were the most influential in increasing ground use” by arboreal primates, said Timothy Eppley, postdoctoral fellow at the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance in California. Eppley led the study, and several of the co-authors credit his leadership for its success. A Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) sits alert while foraging on the forest floor in Madagascar. Photo credit: Timothy Eppley On average, primates in the study spent less than 5 percent of their time on the ground. It doesn’t sound like much, but any time on the ground is dangerous. Predators can strike in a matter of seconds, said study co-author Patricia Wright, a conservation biologist at Stony Brook University in New York. Even so, some animals take the risk. The study revealed that species with certain social and physical traits may have an advantage. Primates with diverse diets and larger group sizes might adapt more easily to terrestrial…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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