A solemn Kanimari man looks at filmmaker Céline Cousteau and says, “I’m 28 years old. All of my cousins — my relatives that were born at the same time as me — they’re all dead.” He lives in one of the many villages in the Javari Valley Indigenous Territory at the remote northwest edge of the Brazilian Amazon, an area plagued by persistent disease, neglect, and death. This is one of the scenes from Cousteau’s new film, Tribes on the Edge, a documentary feature that offers a raw look at the lives, culture and struggles of the people of the Javari Valley, the second-largest Indigenous territory in the Brazilian Amazon and home to an estimated 2,000 isolated Indigenous people. Cousteau is the granddaughter of the legendary Jacques Cousteau, the late ocean conservationist, and builds on her family’s track record of high-impact documentary film and conservation. She traveled to the Amazon as it teetered on its tipping point, — the knife edge marking the inexorable unraveling of the lush rainforest into a dry savanna — document the lives of the Indigenous peoples who are largely responsible for the parts of the rainforest that are still standing today, despite threats to their own survival. Following up on a request from Beto Marubo, a prominent Indigenous Amazon leader and representative of the Javari Valley peoples, Cousteau spent three years documenting the people’s reality fighting against disease in the Amazon — where death as a legacy of colonialism has persisted for decades — as…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.