In just over a month, the world will gather in Egypt for the United Nations’ annual climate summit. This will be the 27th Conference of Parties, or COP, which has met every year since 1995 to negotiate international climate action. Once attended mostly by meteorologists and other scientists, as the impacts of climate change have become undeniable the gathering has grown in significance. Trillion-dollar financial commitments and major energy initiatives are now unveiled at each COP — however effective they wind up proving in the long run. This year’s summit is the first on the African continent since 2017, when it was held in Morocco. For negotiators and climate advocates across the continent, many of them deeply frustrated with the direction of international climate policy, COP27 is a crucial opportunity to make Africa’s case for more financing and support. And for their wealthy-country counterparts, distracted by geopolitical crises as they may be, the window is narrowing to prove that they’re willing to turn sympathetic rhetoric into a plan of action for the continent. Despite producing less than 4% of the world’s carbon emissions, on the whole Africa is already facing some of the worst and most tangible effects of climate change so far. Temperatures on the continent have risen at a faster pace than the global average, and this year alone a warming climate has been linked to devastating tropical storms in Madagascar and Mozambique, flooding in South Africa, and one of the worst droughts ever seen in the Horn…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.